Interactive Banner Advertising Converts to Leads

Written by Zac Johnson
social social social

Yesterday I came across a new banner advertisement from CPX Interactive, which is a cpm banner based advertising site like ValueClick Media or CasaleMedia. Instead of the the traditional banners we are all used to, with the goal of simply getting the user to click, this new banner was quite interactive with the user. The concept of this banner was to have the visitor answer a question (check box) from within the banner, then walk them through a couple extra questions, while the offers would pop open in a new browser. Not only was this good for the advertiser, but it was good for the site the banner was placed on, because the visitor never left the site. Here is how the banner process went.

STEP 1: First Banner Appearance
The first time you see the banner above, it simply asks the question, “What is 50 Cent’s real name?“. You are then given three choices to select.

STEP 2: Would You Like a Free Ringtone?
The majority of banners in the past that I’ve seen, would usually send the visitor directly to a ringtones landing page, but not this one. After all, you already have interaction with the user, so why not ask what they want. If you click “YES”, a popup window will appear with the landing page for a free ringtone. If you click “NO”, you will not get a popup, and the step 3 will be shown instead.

STEP 3: Choose Your Free Gift
Now that the advertiser already has the visitor answering questions, (and possibly already got a ringtone signup), why not ask for me? The advertiser then follows up with an option to select a “free gift”. Once selecting your choice, a new pop up window will appear along with the free gift form process.

STEP 4: Thank You
To end out the banner process, you are given a thank you page, which then reminds you to go through the signup process and provides you with a link, if you hadn’t already seen the pop up window earlier.

I’ve seen a lot of banner ads over the years and I know the flash / gaming type banners (which lead to zip/email offers), have done very well with click through rates. I’d like to see what type of numbers these ad campaigns back out into. If you were able to create this same type of banner process and buy a ton of cheap inventory across social networks (because cpm ads are usually cheap!), you could probably make good money. After all, CPX Interactive has been around for quite some time and it looks like they are running these banners and campaigns in-house across a few sites.

Have you come across any new banner types like this, or seen anything better that grabbed your eyes?

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10 Replies to “Interactive Banner Advertising Converts to Leads”

  1. That's pretty cool… I think users in these demographics tend to be used to what happens after a banner click, so giving them something different and unexpected would likely work very well. Thanks for highlighting this!

  2. pretty interesting. i admire the banners cpxinteractive uses, because they make visitors want to click the banner becasue of the interactivity. This new banners shows how good cpx is doing this. i like them, except for the fact that their ecpm is extremly low… at least for me…

    1. Their CPMs are much lower because they accept most sites and traffic that CasaleMedia and ValueClick Media won't. The good thing is, if you are having trouble converting offers, they will pay on CPM, and I believe you can also run them in lowe ad positions than the higher quality networks.

  3. Neat… anyone know how the banners are designed? Really like the tech behind it and could see a ton of applications….

    I'm guessing Flash and Javascript?

    Anybody… anybody… Bueller…. Bueller?

    Jason

  4. I like the idea of drawing the customer in rather than beating him over the head!

  5. Does anyone remember shock the monkey? I loved that one even though I never let the ad load.

  6. We've coded adverts like this at Kino Creative in the past, but clients tend to prefer more visually appealing adverts and I can understand why. I mean if an offer is precented in a fast and punchy fashion then you hope they're going to click through anyway, and you can then just direct them through to a much better landing page with a form.

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